the gorgeous dancer and choreography Jeni LeGon c.1935

 

the gorgeous dancer and choreography Jeni LeGon c.1935

 

FREE BOOKyeah I said 
FREE BOOK!!
Black London: Life Before Emancipation by Gretchen Gerzina (1995)A glimpse into the lives of the thousands of Africans living in eighteenth century London. 
Download PDF
Read online
More information

FREE BOOK
yeah I said

FREE BOOK!!


Black London: Life Before Emancipation by Gretchen Gerzina (1995)
A glimpse into the lives of the thousands of Africans living in eighteenth century London. 

Download PDF

Read online

More information

kat-ruffin:

Eartha Kitt and Josphine Baker, 1950s

kat-ruffin:

Eartha Kitt and Josphine Baker, 1950s

(via nonafaustine)

An unknown model in a Madrid photography studio c.1925

An unknown model in a Madrid photography studio c.1925

#1920s  
Mrs Eleanor Xiniwe (née Ndwanya) of the African Choir, 1891. Photographed by London Stereoscopic Company studios.


Between 1891-1893 a group of young Africans singers toured Britain and North American as the ’ African Choir’. Inspired by Orpheus M. McAdoo’s Virginia Jubilee Singers, they were a Christian choir on a mission to raise funds for a technical school in Kimberley in the Cape Colony (South Africa). 


The Choir’s members included Paul Xiniwe and his wife Eleanor, Sannie Koopman, Charlotte Makhomo Manye, Johanna Jonkers, Josiah Semouse and a Miss Gwashu. 

Above: African Choir, London 1891. Photograph by The London Stereoscopic Company.

Charlotte Manye (first woman on the right) was 17 years old when the African Choir arrived in London. While on tour with the Choir in the US she was offered at scholarship at Wilberforce University, the African Methodist Episcopal Church university in Xenia, Ohio. She became the first South African woman to earn a Doctorate in Arts and Humanities and she was betrothed to a fellow graduate, Dr. Marshall Maxeke. 
Organisations that Dr Charlotte Manye Maxeke founded, including the the Bantu Women’s League and AME Church’s Widow’s Mite Society, were responsible for educating literally thousands of young Africans and campaigned for women’s rights in South Africa. She was an early and very active member of the African National Congress, writing much of their early literature, and a passionate advocate for African liberty.  
She died in 1939 at the age of 65. 


Above: Charlotte Makhomo Manye, aged 17 years old, The Illustrated London News, August 1891.   

Mrs Eleanor Xiniwe (née Ndwanya) of the African Choir, 1891. Photographed by London Stereoscopic Company studios.

Between 1891-1893 a group of young Africans singers toured Britain and North American as the ’ African Choir’. Inspired by Orpheus M. McAdoo’s Virginia Jubilee Singers, they were a Christian choir on a mission to raise funds for a technical school in Kimberley in the Cape Colony (South Africa). 

The Choir’s members included Paul Xiniwe and his wife Eleanor, Sannie Koopman, Charlotte Makhomo Manye, Johanna Jonkers, Josiah Semouse and a Miss Gwashu. 

African Choir on tour in London, 1891.

Above: African Choir, London 1891. Photograph by The London Stereoscopic Company.

Charlotte Manye (first woman on the right) was 17 years old when the African Choir arrived in London. While on tour with the Choir in the US she was offered at scholarship at Wilberforce University, the African Methodist Episcopal Church university in Xenia, Ohio. She became the first South African woman to earn a Doctorate in Arts and Humanities and she was betrothed to a fellow graduate, Dr. Marshall Maxeke. 

Organisations that Dr Charlotte Manye Maxeke founded, including the the Bantu Women’s League and AME Church’s Widow’s Mite Society, were responsible for educating literally thousands of young Africans and campaigned for women’s rights in South Africa. She was an early and very active member of the African National Congress, writing much of their early literature, and a passionate advocate for African liberty.  

She died in 1939 at the age of 65. 

Makhomo Charlotte Manye

Above: Charlotte Makhomo Manye, aged 17 years old, The Illustrated London News, August 1891.   

(Source: autograph-abp.co.uk)

classicladiesofcolor:

Blues singer Hazel Meyers’ recording career composed of a total of forty-one sides, the majority waxed between September 1923 and August 1924.

classicladiesofcolor:

Blues singer Hazel Meyers’ recording career composed of a total of forty-one sides, the majority waxed between September 1923 and August 1924.

(Source: ipernity.com, via kittyinva)

processedlives:

Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean 
“The emotions, feelings, thoughts of the ‘underclass’ — such as these three men (c. 1903) are not recorded in books. But their history lives on in the memories of their grandchildren. It is through them that the oral historian ‘enters the minds and hearts of the ancestors’.”
Erna Brodber

This article is A MUST READ!!
Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean by Erna Brodber, Jamaica Journal, Vol 16. No 4.,1983website | pdf
"you who feel the pain of history-less-ness, look at the work patterns, the dances, the dreams, the songs, and the memories of your forefathers; analyse these and you will be writing your history"  - Erna Brodber (1983)
"for we who have achieved nothingworkwho have not builtdreamwho have forgotten alldanceand dare to rememberso let me singnothingnowlet me remembernothingnowlet me suffer nothingto remind me nowof my lost children”   - Rights of Passage (1967),Edward Kamau Braithwaite

processedlives:

Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean

“The emotions, feelings, thoughts of the ‘underclass’ — such as these three men (c. 1903) are not recorded in books. But their history lives on in the memories of their grandchildren. It is through them that the oral historian ‘enters the minds and hearts of the ancestors’.”

Erna Brodber

This article is A MUST READ!!

Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean by Erna Brodber, Jamaica Journal, Vol 16. No 4.,1983
websitepdf


"you who feel the pain of history-less-ness, look at the work patterns, the dances, the dreams, the songs, and the memories of your forefathers; analyse these and you will be writing your history"
  - Erna Brodber (1983)

"for we who have achieved nothing
work
who have not built
dream
who have forgotten all
dance
and dare to remember
so let me sing
nothing
now
let me remember
nothing
now
let me suffer 
nothing
to remind me now
of my lost children”
   - Rights of Passage (1967),Edward Kamau Braithwaite

theshinyboogie:

Circus dancers, 1930s

in
LOVE
with 
EVERYTHING!!!!!!!!!!

theshinyboogie:

Circus dancers, 1930s

in

LOVE

with

EVERYTHING!!!!!!!!!!

(Source: emigrejukebox, via holdthisphoto)

Rev Thomas Jackson, the founder of The Working Lads Institute in London’s East End, with five young men at the time of World War I. 
Founded in 1876, the The Working Lads Institute rehabilitated young men involved in petty criminal activities through work at the Whitechapel Mission. The young Black men in uniform were are likely to be former residents. The Whitechapel Mission is still working with London’s homeless today.
Can anyone identify the uniform, is it an army regiment?
SOURCE: Whitechapel Lads | Spitalfields Life

Rev Thomas Jackson, the founder of The Working Lads Institute in London’s East End, with five young men at the time of World War I. 

Founded in 1876, the The Working Lads Institute rehabilitated young men involved in petty criminal activities through work at the Whitechapel Mission. The young Black men in uniform were are likely to be former residents. The Whitechapel Mission is still working with London’s homeless today.

Can anyone identify the uniform, is it an army regiment?

SOURCE: Whitechapel Lads | Spitalfields Life

The Sergeants of the British West India Regiment in Palestine, First World War
(from the collection of Paul Ironside)
Source: Trinidadians in World War One
The Sergeants of the British West India Regiment in Palestine, First World War
(from the collection of Paul Ironside)

Source: Trinidadians in World War One