Mrs Paul Xiniwe (née Ndwanya) of the African Choir, 1891. Photographed by London Stereoscopic Company studios.


Between 1891-1893 a group of young Africans singers toured Britain and North American as the ’ African Choir’. Inspired by Orpheus M. McAdoo’s Virginia Jubliee Singers, they were a Christian choir on a mission to raise funds for a technical school in Kimberley in the Cape Colony (South Africa). 


The Choir’s members included Paul Xiniwe and his wife (pictured above), Sannie Koopman, Charlotte Makhomo Manye, Johanna Jonkers, Josiah Semouse and a Miss Gwashu. 

Above: African Choir, London 1891. Photograph by The London Stereoscopic Company.

Charlotte Manye (first woman on the right) was 17 years old when the African Choir arrived in London. While on tour with the Choir in the US she was offered at scholarship at Wilberforce University, the African Methodist Episcopal Church university in Xenia, Ohio. She became the first South African woman to earn a Doctorate in Arts and Humanities and she was betrothed to a fellow graduate, Dr. Marshall Maxeke. 
Organisations that Dr Charlotte Manye Maxeke founded, including the the Bantu Women’s League and AME Church’s Widow’s Mite Society, were responsible for educating literally thousands of young Africans and campaigned for women’s rights in South Africa. She was an early and very active member of the African National Congress, writing much of their early literature, and a passionate advocate for African liberty.  
She died in 1939 at the age of 65. 


Above: Charlotte Makhomo Manye, aged 17 years old, The Illustrated London News, August 1891.   

Mrs Paul Xiniwe (née Ndwanya) of the African Choir, 1891. Photographed by London Stereoscopic Company studios.

Between 1891-1893 a group of young Africans singers toured Britain and North American as the ’ African Choir’. Inspired by Orpheus M. McAdoo’s Virginia Jubliee Singers, they were a Christian choir on a mission to raise funds for a technical school in Kimberley in the Cape Colony (South Africa). 

The Choir’s members included Paul Xiniwe and his wife (pictured above), Sannie Koopman, Charlotte Makhomo Manye, Johanna Jonkers, Josiah Semouse and a Miss Gwashu. 

African Choir on tour in London, 1891.

Above: African Choir, London 1891. Photograph by The London Stereoscopic Company.

Charlotte Manye (first woman on the right) was 17 years old when the African Choir arrived in London. While on tour with the Choir in the US she was offered at scholarship at Wilberforce University, the African Methodist Episcopal Church university in Xenia, Ohio. She became the first South African woman to earn a Doctorate in Arts and Humanities and she was betrothed to a fellow graduate, Dr. Marshall Maxeke. 

Organisations that Dr Charlotte Manye Maxeke founded, including the the Bantu Women’s League and AME Church’s Widow’s Mite Society, were responsible for educating literally thousands of young Africans and campaigned for women’s rights in South Africa. She was an early and very active member of the African National Congress, writing much of their early literature, and a passionate advocate for African liberty.  

She died in 1939 at the age of 65. 

Makhomo Charlotte Manye

Above: Charlotte Makhomo Manye, aged 17 years old, The Illustrated London News, August 1891.   

(Source: autograph-abp.co.uk)

classicladiesofcolor:

Blues singer Hazel Meyers’ recording career composed of a total of forty-one sides, the majority waxed between September 1923 and August 1924.

classicladiesofcolor:

Blues singer Hazel Meyers’ recording career composed of a total of forty-one sides, the majority waxed between September 1923 and August 1924.

(Source: ipernity.com, via kittyinva)

processedlives:

Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean 
“The emotions, feelings, thoughts of the ‘underclass’ — such as these three men (c. 1903) are not recorded in books. But their history lives on in the memories of their grandchildren. It is through them that the oral historian ‘enters the minds and hearts of the ancestors’.”
Erna Brodber

This article is A MUST READ!!
Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean by Erna Brodber, Jamaica Journal, Vol 16. No 4.,1983website | pdf
"you who feel the pain of history-less-ness, look at the work patterns, the dances, the dreams, the songs, and the memories of your forefathers; analyse these and you will be writing your history"  - Erna Brodber (1983)
"for we who have achieved nothingworkwho have not builtdreamwho have forgotten alldanceand dare to rememberso let me singnothingnowlet me remembernothingnowlet me suffer nothingto remind me nowof my lost children”   - Rights of Passage (1967),Edward Kamau Braithwaite

processedlives:

Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean

“The emotions, feelings, thoughts of the ‘underclass’ — such as these three men (c. 1903) are not recorded in books. But their history lives on in the memories of their grandchildren. It is through them that the oral historian ‘enters the minds and hearts of the ancestors’.”

Erna Brodber

This article is A MUST READ!!

Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean by Erna Brodber, Jamaica Journal, Vol 16. No 4.,1983
websitepdf


"you who feel the pain of history-less-ness, look at the work patterns, the dances, the dreams, the songs, and the memories of your forefathers; analyse these and you will be writing your history"
  - Erna Brodber (1983)

"for we who have achieved nothing
work
who have not built
dream
who have forgotten all
dance
and dare to remember
so let me sing
nothing
now
let me remember
nothing
now
let me suffer 
nothing
to remind me now
of my lost children”
   - Rights of Passage (1967),Edward Kamau Braithwaite

theshinyboogie:

Circus dancers, 1930s

in
LOVE
with 
EVERYTHING!!!!!!!!!!

theshinyboogie:

Circus dancers, 1930s

in

LOVE

with

EVERYTHING!!!!!!!!!!

(via holdthisphoto)

Rev Thomas Jackson, the founder of The Working Lads Institute in London’s East End, with five young men at the time of World War I. 
Founded in 1876, the The Working Lads Institute rehabilitated young men involved in petty criminal activities through work at the Whitechapel Mission. The young Black men in uniform were are likely to be former residents. The Whitechapel Mission is still working with London’s homeless today.
Can anyone identify the uniform, is it an army regiment?
SOURCE: Whitechapel Lads | Spitalfields Life

Rev Thomas Jackson, the founder of The Working Lads Institute in London’s East End, with five young men at the time of World War I. 

Founded in 1876, the The Working Lads Institute rehabilitated young men involved in petty criminal activities through work at the Whitechapel Mission. The young Black men in uniform were are likely to be former residents. The Whitechapel Mission is still working with London’s homeless today.

Can anyone identify the uniform, is it an army regiment?

SOURCE: Whitechapel Lads | Spitalfields Life

The Sergeants of the British West India Regiment in Palestine, First World War
(from the collection of Paul Ironside)
Source: Trinidadians in World War One
The Sergeants of the British West India Regiment in Palestine, First World War
(from the collection of Paul Ironside)

Source: Trinidadians in World War One

Lance-Corporal Julien, a former Policeman from Trinidad received the Distinguished Conduct Medal for bravery and valourious service 
Source: Trinidadians who served in World War I

Lance-Corporal Julien, a former Policeman from Trinidad received the Distinguished Conduct Medal for bravery and valourious service 

Source: Trinidadians who served in World War I

ryanshistoryblog:

1st Battalion of the British West Indies Regiment in Egypt, 1916.
From: The UK National Archives

(Source: CO 1069-369-27, The National Archives (part of the Colonial Office photographic collection held at The National Archives)

ryanshistoryblog:

1st Battalion of the British West Indies Regiment in Egypt, 1916.

From: The UK National Archives

(Source: CO 1069-369-27, The National Archives (part of the Colonial Office photographic collection held at The National Archives)

661 Lance Corporal McCollin Leekam of Trinidad, British West Indies Regiment receiving a citation from General E. Chaytor of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade and commander of Chaytor’s Force - Turkish Palestine 1918.

source: Blackman - Whiteman - Jew | New Zealand Mounted Rifles 

[over the next few months in the run up to the centenary of the start of World War One I’ll be posting images of Black British, Caribbean, African and African American soldiers involved in the Great War. If you know of any photos or perhaps even have family photos you want to share let me know lascasartoris@gmail.com xL]

Submission: Green Jackets and Purple Caps

medievalpoc:

hiya love the blog

a quick fyi

there’s a huge Vernonese exhibition in London at the minute. Art historian Jan Marsh has a blog post on Ruskin’s comments on Veronese’s “black boys in green jackets and purple caps”.

http://janmarsh.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/black-boys-in-green-jackets-and-purple.html

have a great day

Thanks for submitting the article above, and informing people who might be in London now or soon about the exhibit. Veronese’s work is definitely populated with many people of color, especially young Black men.

I think the article, while a little off in its delivery, touches on an important fact-the way we view these works is absolutely affected by men like Ruskin, a massively influential Victorian Art Critic. This influence is international; Tolstoy translated his works into Russian, Proust translated him into French, Ryuzo Mikimoto translated him into Japanese, and Gandhi translated his works into Gujarati. Ruskin’s attitude toward these figures from the past was not only flippantly racist, he projected these anti-Black attitudes into his writing on art and aesthetics, which were then, as I mention above, spread throughout the world. From the article:

The big new VERONESE exhibition at the National Gallery is my opportunity to check out Ruskin’s distasteful jokes during the US Civil War - that in his view the main purpose of Negroes was to be painted by Veronese, and his unamusing request  that Charles Eliot Norton send him ‘something American - a slave perhaps. I’ve a great notion of a black boy in a green jacket and purple cap in Paul Veronese’s manner.’

This is how white supremacist notions of beauty, aesthetics, and the devaluation of Black people specifically have become disseminated on a global scale.The more we analyze the eras between when these works were made and the present day, the greater our understanding of how skewed our perspectives have become.

So after reflecting on Ruskin’s comment on Vernonese’s “black boys” I was curious about what else he had to say about ” the negro”. Thanks to Wikipedia dug up that Ruskin was also a supporter of General Eyre, the then Governor of Jamaica, who brutally suppressed the Morant Bay Rebellion in 1865. 

Paul Bogle, a Baptist deacon who is today remembered today as a National Hero of Jamaica, led Black men and women, who agitated for justice and fair treatment for all in Jamaica, into the town Morant Bay in the east of the island. In response Eyre declared martial law, over 400 Jamaicans were killed directly by soldiers, and 354 more (included Paul Bogle) were arrested and later “executed” or lynched under without proper trials. Over 600 men and women were flogged and thousands of homes belonging to Black Jamaicans were burned to the ground. 

Back in England there was a fierce public outcry at the abuse of power and calls for Eyre to be tried for the murder of British subjects.  Led by John Stuart Mill The Jamaica Committee (whose members included Charles Darwin and John Tyndall) formed immediately after the rebellion to monitor the government’s response. 

Thomas Carlyle set up the “Eyre Defence and Aid Fund” in opposition to the Jamaica Committee. Carlyle had previously published “Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question" (sixteen years AFTER the emancipation of enslaved Africans in the British Empire) that suggested slavery should never have been abolished and supported indentured labour. Included in Carlyle’s group to defend Eyre were Charles Dickens, Alfred Lord Tennyson. and John Ruskin. 

John Ruskin’s activities in support of General Eyre are listed in The Life of John Ruskin (1923);

The Jamaica Committee attempted three times to try Eyre for murder, but he was never prosecuted. 

In a rather personal twist my grandmother is from Morant Bay. She would often speak of how her uncle described that as a boy he saw  “street a run wid blud” during the Rebellion and remind me of the sacrifice Paul Bogle made in support of his community and the liberation of people of Jamaica. I also live very close to Denmark Hill in London where Ruskin lived for 52 years before buggering off complaining the the new railways had “spoilt his view”.