girlhattan
girlhattan:

SO MUCH COSTUME PORN
(via Break Out the Bubbly, The Great Gatsby Trailer Is Finally Here)


The Great Gatsby trailer is here!!
There is some controversary on Youtube about the fabulousness in the above scene.
“Black people weren’t sipping champagne while standing in a drop top on a bridge…” they cry
*Ahem*
Its in the book! Chapter Four…

girlhattan:

SO MUCH COSTUME PORN

(via Break Out the Bubbly, The Great Gatsby Trailer Is Finally Here)

The Great Gatsby trailer is here!!

There is some controversary on Youtube about the fabulousness in the above scene.

Black people weren’t sipping champagne while standing in a drop top on a bridge…” they cry

*Ahem*

Its in the book! Chapter Four…

rlaneri
rlaneri:

Winold Reiss: “Sari Price Patton,” 1925. Private collection. © The Reiss Partnership.
I came across Winold Reiss’ painting of this chic young woman at the wonderful exhibition “Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties” at the Brooklyn Museum. I love the Patton’s trendy page-boy haircut and her loose-fitting, low-waisted black silk gown and the yellow pleated ruffled tie and cuffs. She’s fashionable and youthful. She’s also black: You don’t see very many portraits of middle-class black women — or men — in many major museum shows, so I was intrigued.
There is very little info available on Sari Price Patton, but she was the hostess at a popular Harlem salon run by A’Lelia Walker. A patroness of black artists, including Harlem Renaissance writers like Langston Hughes, Walker hosted black writers, sculptors, poets, painters, musicians and their friends at her house, serving food, champagne and gin. She and her friends decided to open a more formal salon, for conversation, poetry readings and art exhibitions, called ”The Dark Tower” (after the Countee Cullens poem). Yet the Dark Tower only lasted a year: partly because Walker had hoped to profit from the enterprise so started charging high prices the artists couldn’t afford. (The writer Bruce Nugent griped that “Colored faces were at a premium, the place filled to overflowing with with whites from downtown who had come up expecting that this was a new and hot nightclub.”*
But the club also lost money because our Sari Price Patton was caught embezzling some of the daily receipts. This was in 1927/1928, so before Reiss painted the chic young woman here.
* From “On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker” by A’Lelia Bundles 
Painting from the Brooklyn Museum’s website

rlaneri:

Winold Reiss: “Sari Price Patton,” 1925. Private collection. © The Reiss Partnership.

I came across Winold Reiss’ painting of this chic young woman at the wonderful exhibition “Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties” at the Brooklyn Museum. I love the Patton’s trendy page-boy haircut and her loose-fitting, low-waisted black silk gown and the yellow pleated ruffled tie and cuffs. She’s fashionable and youthful. She’s also black: You don’t see very many portraits of middle-class black women — or men — in many major museum shows, so I was intrigued.

There is very little info available on Sari Price Patton, but she was the hostess at a popular Harlem salon run by A’Lelia Walker. A patroness of black artists, including Harlem Renaissance writers like Langston Hughes, Walker hosted black writers, sculptors, poets, painters, musicians and their friends at her house, serving food, champagne and gin. She and her friends decided to open a more formal salon, for conversation, poetry readings and art exhibitions, called ”The Dark Tower” (after the Countee Cullens poem). Yet the Dark Tower only lasted a year: partly because Walker had hoped to profit from the enterprise so started charging high prices the artists couldn’t afford. (The writer Bruce Nugent griped that “Colored faces were at a premium, the place filled to overflowing with with whites from downtown who had come up expecting that this was a new and hot nightclub.”*

But the club also lost money because our Sari Price Patton was caught embezzling some of the daily receipts. This was in 1927/1928, so before Reiss painted the chic young woman here.

* From “On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker” by A’Lelia Bundles 

Painting from the Brooklyn Museum’s website

dynastylnoire
vintageblackglamour:

Mae Walker, granddaughter of Madam C.J. Walker, on her wedding day in Harlem, November 1923. Mae’s granddaughter @AleliaBundles is writing a book about the famously opulent event (here is an excerpt, complete with great pictures) that drew guests from around the world. 

"Mae Walker’s headdress was inspired by the recently opened King Tut tomb."- a must read 

vintageblackglamour:

Mae Walker, granddaughter of Madam C.J. Walker, on her wedding day in Harlem, November 1923. Mae’s granddaughter @AleliaBundles is writing a book about the famously opulent event (here is an excerpt, complete with great pictures) that drew guests from around the world. 

"Mae Walker’s headdress was inspired by the recently opened King Tut tomb."
- a must read 

"Florence Mills in male attire* (Aida Overton Walker style**) for Mandy’s wedding"- original caption
(Source: Johnny Nit Collection***)
* more images of women in White Tie on my pinterest here
** In the early part of her career Aida Overton Walker performed in a vaudeville act with her husband. When he became too ill to perform she often wore her husbands male costume, playing his role and her own. 
*** From the Johnny Nit collection. Known in the UK as the “Dancing Star of Blackbirds”. Check out a 1932 Pathe film of his “Steppin’ Fast” routine.
Nit starred along side Florence Mills in New York and traveled with her to England in 1926 as part of the cast of Blackbirds. He stayed in Britain where he died in 1951. 
Apparently his papers have been donated to the Theatre Collection at the V&A in London. I’ll have to check it out next time I’m there. 

"Florence Mills in male attire* (Aida Overton Walker style**) for Mandy’s wedding"
- original caption

(Source: Johnny Nit Collection***)

* more images of women in White Tie on my pinterest here

** In the early part of her career Aida Overton Walker performed in a vaudeville act with her husband. When he became too ill to perform she often wore her husbands male costume, playing his role and her own. 

*** From the Johnny Nit collection. Known in the UK as the “Dancing Star of Blackbirds”. Check out a 1932 Pathe film of his “Steppin’ Fast” routine.

Nit starred along side Florence Mills in New York and traveled with her to England in 1926 as part of the cast of Blackbirds. He stayed in Britain where he died in 1951. 

Apparently his papers have been donated to the Theatre Collection at the V&A in London. I’ll have to check it out next time I’m there. 

1. Florence Mills and the chorus of the ‘Blackbirds’ rehearsing on the roof of the Pavilion Theatre, London.

2. Gwendlyn Graham the world champion charleston dancer (centre) with the chorus of the “Blackbirds”  during rehearsals, on the roof of the Pavilion  Theatre. 

3. Florence Mills, Johnny Hudgins on rehearing with the chorus of “Blackbirds”. 

(Sep 1926)

"Florence Mills became the toast of London… It is said the Prince of Wales saw the revue no less than twenty times, which was something unheard of." 
- from Negro (1934)

Florence Mills fell ill during the 1926 run of Blackbirds in the UK. She returned to New York for treatment and died on 1st November 1927. For the first two weeks of November, major newspapers in New York, Britain and France gave front page coverage to her deaths and then her funeral in Harlem

ladyurduja
ieatmypancitwithrice:

Marion Young: Marion grew up in the Harlem’s theatrical district, and as a teen  starting lindy hopping at the Savoy and the Renaissance Ballroom in the  early 1930s.  She and her partner, with other uptown swing dancers,  started taking lindy demonstrations and swing competitions downtown to  the hotels and ballrooms, where it spread like wildfire into the larger  community.  She toured as lindy hop dancer, and then in 1936 joined the  Apollo’s Number One Chorus Line.   She was a leader in the successful Apollo chorus dancer’s strike that shut down the theatre on a Saturday night in February 1940, and  established the American Guild of Variety Artists.   She danced with  “Round the World” tours (Baltimore, DC, Philadelphia, and back to New  York), toured with Leonard Reed, and danced at the 845 until the late  1940s.
(via Tootscrackinproduction)

Marion Coles

ieatmypancitwithrice:

Marion Young: Marion grew up in the Harlem’s theatrical district, and as a teen starting lindy hopping at the Savoy and the Renaissance Ballroom in the early 1930s. She and her partner, with other uptown swing dancers, started taking lindy demonstrations and swing competitions downtown to the hotels and ballrooms, where it spread like wildfire into the larger community. She toured as lindy hop dancer, and then in 1936 joined the Apollo’s Number One Chorus Line.   She was a leader in the successful Apollo chorus dancer’s strike that shut down the theatre on a Saturday night in February 1940, and established the American Guild of Variety Artists.   She danced with “Round the World” tours (Baltimore, DC, Philadelphia, and back to New York), toured with Leonard Reed, and danced at the 845 until the late 1940s.

(via Tootscrackinproduction)

Marion Coles

"Bertye Lou Wood in her 1st professional dance job in 1928, poses to the left of dance director Addison Cary."
Bertye Lou was a Dance Captain at the Apollo Theatre in the 1930s and one of the leaders of the Apollo Theatre Chorus Girls Strike in 1934, that successfully campaigned for better wages and established the AGVA (American Guild for Variety Artists).
Bertye Lou was featured in the 2006 documentary Been Rich All My Life. The documentary follows the lives of the Silver Bells, ladies aged 84-96 who were Harlem showgirls in the heyday of 1930’s clubs.

"Bertye Lou Wood in her 1st professional dance job in 1928, poses to the left of dance director Addison Cary."

Bertye Lou was a Dance Captain at the Apollo Theatre in the 1930s and one of the leaders of the Apollo Theatre Chorus Girls Strike in 1934, that successfully campaigned for better wages and established the AGVA (American Guild for Variety Artists).

Bertye Lou was featured in the 2006 documentary Been Rich All My Life. The documentary follows the lives of the Silver Bells, ladies aged 84-96 who were Harlem showgirls in the heyday of 1930’s clubs.