deviatesinc:

Josephine Baker, 1926
photo by Madame d’Ora

gorgeous “new to me” portrait of Mlle Baker. 
Thank you deviatesinc!

deviatesinc:

Josephine Baker, 1926

photo by Madame d’Ora

gorgeous “new to me” portrait of Mlle Baker.

Thank you deviatesinc!

lascasartoris:




Josephine Baker, in her French Free Air Force uniform, and Lena Horne in front of the Lincoln Memorial at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 28 Aug 1963. 
Josephine Baker was the only woman to address the crowds that day.
UPDATE 23/9/2013:
READ MORE

AuntAda adds this commentary: Just a clarification regarding the March on Washington. Josephine Baker addressed the crowd at the March before the official program began. Daisy Bates was actually the only woman to deliver one of the March’s keynote addresses. Bates was the substitute speaker for Myrlie Evers, who was originally scheduled to speak but was unable to attend the event.

lascasartoris:

Josephine Baker, in her French Free Air Force uniform, and Lena Horne in front of the Lincoln Memorial at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 28 Aug 1963. 

Josephine Baker was the only woman to address the crowds that day.

UPDATE 23/9/2013:

READ MORE

AuntAda adds this commentary: Just a clarification regarding the March on Washington. Josephine Baker addressed the crowd at the March before the official program began. Daisy Bates was actually the only woman to deliver one of the March’s keynote addresses. Bates was the substitute speaker for Myrlie Evers, who was originally scheduled to speak but was unable to attend the event.

heytoyourmamanem asked: Just a clarification regarding the March on Washington. Josephine Baker addressed the crowd at the March before the official program began. Daisy Bates was actually the only woman to deliver one of the March's keynote addresses. Bates was the substitute speaker for Myrlie Evers, who was originally scheduled to speak but was unable to attend the event.

Sorry, I’ve only just seen your message.

Thanks so much for taking the time to let me know. I’ll make the correction and add your commentary to the posts of Josephine Baker and the March on Washington.

with love from London
xL 




Josephine Baker, in her French Free Air Force uniform, and Lena Horne in front of the Lincoln Memorial at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 28 Aug 1963. 
Josephine Baker was the only woman to address the crowds that day.
UPDATE 23/9/2013:
AuntAda adds this commentary: Just a clarification regarding the March on Washington. Josephine Baker addressed the crowd at the March before the official program began. Daisy Bates was actually the only woman to deliver one of the March’s keynote addresses. Bates was the substitute speaker for Myrlie Evers, who was originally scheduled to speak but was unable to attend the event.
READ MORE

Josephine Baker, in her French Free Air Force uniform, and Lena Horne in front of the Lincoln Memorial at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 28 Aug 1963. 

Josephine Baker was the only woman to address the crowds that day.

UPDATE 23/9/2013:

AuntAda adds this commentary: Just a clarification regarding the March on Washington. Josephine Baker addressed the crowd at the March before the official program began. Daisy Bates was actually the only woman to deliver one of the March’s keynote addresses. Bates was the substitute speaker for Myrlie Evers, who was originally scheduled to speak but was unable to attend the event.

READ MORE

Josephine Baker - speaks at the March on Washington 1963

image

Josephine Baker, in her French Free Air Force uniform, and Lena Horne in front of the Lincoln Memorial at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 28 Aug 1963

She closed her speech by saying:

“I am not a young woman now, friends. My life is behind me. There is not too much fire burning inside me. And before it goes out, I want you to use what is left to light the fire in you.”

After the march the 31st August Baker wrote to Dr Martin Luther King Jr.:

“I was so happy to have been united with all of you on our great historical day. I repeat that you are really a great, great leader and if you need me I will always be at your disposition because we have come a long way but still have a way to go.”

She signed letter:

“Your great admirer and sister in battle.”

Listen to Bennetta Jules-Rosette, director of the African & African-American Studies Research Center at the University of California—San Diego, and Josephine Baker biographer reflect on hearing Baker address the crowds in Washington.

UPDATE 23/9/2013:
AuntAda adds this commentary: Just a clarification regarding the March on Washington. Josephine Baker addressed the crowd at the March before the official program began. Daisy Bates was actually the only woman to deliver one of the March’s keynote addresses. Bates was the substitute speaker for Myrlie Evers, who was originally scheduled to speak but was unable to attend the event.

image

Josephine Baker prepares to address the crowds at the March on Washington, you can clearly see the medals she was awarded for her service in World War Two (l-r) the Legion d’Honneur, the Croix de Guerre, the Medal of the Resistance, the Medal for Voluntary Service in Free France and the 1939-1945 War Commemorative Medal.

image

blackhistoryalbum:

THE BRONZE VENUS, JOSEPHINE BAKER
Josephine backstage at Follies Bergrere, Paris, France, 1920s
Black History Album, The Way We WereFollow us on WEB  TUMBLR  PINTEREST  FACEBOOK  TWITTER

Correct credit: 
Josephine Baker, Feb 1930 by Luis Ramon Marin .
She didn’t perform at the Folies Bergere in 1930 and was to open at rival venue Casino De Paris in October of the same year in “Paris Qur Remue” (Swinging Paris). Her season at the Casino de Paris marked the her transition from “la sauvage" to a sophisticated Parisienne chanteuse. 
 

blackhistoryalbum:

THE BRONZE VENUS, JOSEPHINE BAKER

Josephine backstage at Follies Bergrere, Paris, France, 1920s

Black History Album, The Way We Were
Follow us on WEB  TUMBLR  PINTEREST  FACEBOOK  TWITTER

Correct credit: 

Josephine Baker, Feb 1930 by Luis Ramon Marin .

She didn’t perform at the Folies Bergere in 1930 and was to open at rival venue Casino De Paris in October of the same year in “Paris Qur Remue” (Swinging Paris). Her season at the Casino de Paris marked the her transition from “la sauvage" to a sophisticated Parisienne chanteuse.

 Josephine Baker, 1930. By Luis Ramon Marin

Jospehine Baker, c1936. Photography by Murray Korman in NYC. 
(via aboundingbelow.tumblr.com)

Jospehine Baker, c1936. Photography by Murray Korman in NYC. 

(via aboundingbelow.tumblr.com)

Josephine Baker, 1960s

(via vintagesonia.tumblr.com

(Source: allstarpics.net)

Diana Ross as Josephine Baker, c1978

Diana Ross as Josephine Baker, c1978

orsons:

Josephine Baker photographed by Gilles Petard

orsons:

Josephine Baker photographed by Gilles Petard

(Source: deforest, via vintagegal)